Platinum Golf nominated Africa’s Best Golf Tour Operator – World Golf Awards

Platinum Golf nominated Africa’s Best Golf Tour Operator – World Golf Awards

Platinum Golf, Tours & Accommodation is very proud to be nominated for the 2nd World Golf Awards in the category ‘Africa’s Best Golf Tour Operator 2015’, after winning the very same category last year.  World Golf Awards serves to celebrate and reward excellence in golf tourism, world class courses and golf destinations.

Golf tourism constitutes a vital segment in the global travel and tourism marketplace. The overwhelming success of the first year launch has created much discussion in the golf tourism world and this event will grow year on year. 2015 will see World Golf Awards returning to the Algarve in Portugal.

The worldwide voting process begins on 2nd March 2015 and closes 27th September 2015. Votes will be made by professionals working within the golf travel and tourism industry – senior executives, travel buyers, tour operators, agents and media professionals. Votes may also be cast by the public (golf tourism consumers). The voting works on a first-past-the-post system to ensure impartiality and independence. Votes are submitted online via the World Golf Awards website.

World Golf Awards is part of World Travel Awards, currently celebrating its 22nd anniversary as “the Oscars of the travel industry”.

You can vote for Platinum Golf, Tours & Accommodation via this link to the World Golf Awards – Africa’s Best Golf Tour Operator.

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Golfers’ Paradise – Knysna Wayside Inn

Golfers’ Paradise – Knysna Wayside Inn

From R 4 930.00 p.p.s.

4 nights B&B / 1 x golf at Pezula Championship Golf Course, Simola Golf Estate and Knysna Golf Course / self-drive (own vehicle)

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Everything went very smoothly…

Everything went very smoothly…

""

— Malcolm & Mary
Everything went very smoothly…

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Platinum Golf, Tours & Accommodation Africa’s Best Golf Tour Operator!

Platinum Golf, Tours & Accommodation Africa’s Best Golf Tour Operator!

At the 1st Annual World Golf Awards held in Portugal over the weekend over 200 prizes were handed out to golf courses, golf hotels, inbound and outbound golf tour operators from all over the world.

The only global initiative to recognize, reward and celebrate excellence in the golf hospitality industry, the event saw St Andrews Links – Old Course recognized as the World’s Best Golf Course, while The Els Club Teluk Datai was awarded the honor of World’s Best New Golf Course.

In two special presentations, Peter Alliss (BBC Golf Commentator) was recognized with the Lifetime Achievement Award for Services to the Golf Industry, while victorious European Ryder Cup captain Paul McGinley was awarded the honor of Golf Personality of the Year.

South Africa was announced as Africa’s Best Golf Destination, with Leopard Creek being voted Africa’s Best Golf Course.  The honor of being voted Africa’s Best Golf Tour Operator went to Platinum Golf, Tours & Accommodation, also based in South Africa.

Says Ypie Kingma, Marketing & Sales of Platinum Golf, Tours & Accommodation: ‘It is such an honor to be recognized like this!  Voting has been going on since May this year, with fellow operators as well as individual golf tourists voting for excellence in service and commitment.  Being the small operation that we are, I personally believe the personal touch and attention to detail is what gives us the advantage needed to win this prestigious award.  I think as a whole the golf industry is continuously growing, and with both Leopard Creek as well as South Africa as a whole winning in their respective categories, this sector of the tourism industry will only attract more visitors to our beautiful South Africa.’

The World Golf Awards are part of the World Travel Awards, having celebrated excellence in the tourism industry for over 20 years.

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Addo Elephant National Park

Addo Elephant National Park

The history of the Addo Elephant National Park is relatively young and has undergone several phases before the park became what it is today: one of the highlights on any South African holiday, both for local as well as international visitors alike.

In the late 1700’s, when the first European settlers visited the area, their sightings of elephant, buffalo, lion, rhino and eland were often and varied.   Wildlife was in abundance, and it did not take long before especially the elephant hunt became popular and widespread, with a roaring ivory trade to go with it.

When the English in the 1800’s started settling in the greater Port Elizabeth area the land surrounding this growing city was not only used for hunting parties, but farmers also divided the land for agricultural use.  The game population came under severe pressure, as their natural habitat got smaller and smaller.  Combined with the increased social hunting and farmers shooting the wildlife off their land, the number of game started diminishing.

By 1853 the last rhino in the area was shot, and another 26 years later also the lion was exterminated.  The elephants in the area raided the farmers’ crops, and in 1919 government bowed for their demands to have all elephants killed…  It was 1919 when a Major Pretorius was contracted to kill the remaining elephants.  He did a thorough job and managed to shoot 114 elephants within a year after his contract started.  Only when 2 young calves were sold to a travelling circus did the public react, and the elephant hunt came to an end.  Sixteen elephants remained.

These 16 elephants found refuge on a Mr. Harvey’s land – who is nowadays remembered by his own ‘loop’ within the park.  By 1925 two substantial pieces of land, the Strathmore and the Mentone Forest Reserve were earmarked as elephant refuges, which – in 1931 – resulted in the proclamation of the actual Addo Elephant National Park.   By that time there were only 11 remaining of the original elephants which roamed the area.

Although this was a major achievement in the elephant conservation in the area, they were not safe as yet.  Fencing around the original park was not adequate, and the elephants kept on breaking out and destroying nearby farmers’ crops.  To the extent that in 1933 Mr. Trollope, who was the then Park Manager, started feeding the elephants to keep them within the boundaries of the park.  With certain feeding times visitors were then invited into the park to enjoy this spectacle.  The elephants got used to being fed at certain times of the day, and consequently started harassing the feeding trucks.  Furthermore they would no longer roam around the park, but rather stick to the feeding area, afraid as they were to miss out on the next feeding session.  The area got depleted; elephants got stressed and started becoming aggressive towards each other.  Slowly but surely the feeding sessions stopped, and this practice was abandoned altogether in 1975.

In the mean time other game species, as originally recorded in the area, were being protected byt the establishment of the park, in particular the Cape buffalo and the flightless dung beetle.  In 1957 eland was being reintroduced, followed by the Burchell’s zebra and warthog in 1996.  Last but not least the reintroduction of (Kalahari) lion into the Addo Elephant National Park was completed in 2003, together with the extension of the park to the more than 180,000ha it currently covers.

Click here to read about our visit to the Addo Elephant National Park.

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